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Trial Guides Presents Don Keenan and David Ball's Reptile

David Ball, America's most influential trial consultant, has changed the face of modern trial advocacy. He has written two best selling books: David Ball on Damages and Theater Tips & Strategies for Jury Trials, and has advised on more than a thousand civil and criminal cases.

Attorney Don Keenan has obtained 145 verdicts/settlements over $1 million, eight over $10 million and one verdict over $100 million. He was the youngest president of the Inner Circle of Advocates, and Oprah Winfrey distinguished him as a "person of courage" for his child advocacy work.

Together, David Ball and Don Keenan are revolutionizing plaintiff's law with REPTILE: The 2009 Manual of the Plaintiff's Revolution. Learn about the reptile brain, and how and why jurors make the decisions they do. This groundbreaking new research from Ball, Keenan, Jim Fitzgerald, and Gary C. Johnson teaches you how to make tort reform have only a negligible impact on juries. Using the jurors' most primitive instincts of safety and self-preservation, you can show jurors that your case isn't only about getting justice for your plaintiff, but about protecting their communities.  This provides a modern interpretation of timeless advocacy concepts like Moe Levine's "Juries are the conscience of the community" argument.

Trial Guides founder Aaron DeShaw consulted with David Ball on the book during its writing and development, believing at first it would be published by Trial Guides. Don Keenan has decided to publish the book through his Keenan Kids Foundation, so Trial Guides will be distributing the book for the children's charity. We are happy to be helping raise funds for this deserving charity.

Reptile will supplement your use of David Ball on Damages and Rick Friedman's and Patrick Malone's Rules of the Road, giving you the knowledge you need to help jurors arrive at the correct verdict.

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