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Trial Guides Distributes Winning Jury Trials: Trial Tactics and Sponsorship Strategy

Trial Guides, in cooperation with NITA, brings you Winning Jury Trials: Trial Tactics and Sponsorship Strategy by Robert Klonoff & Paul Colby.

Winning Jury Trials covers a broad spectrum of issues likely to confront the advocate every day, and provides a "default position" on how to resolve most tactical issues arising at trial. Winning Jury Trials covers such topics as:

  • Which witnesses to call.
  • Whether to introduce negative evidence.
  • How to handle marginal evidence.
  • How to tie everything else—exhibits, opening and closing statements, cross examination—into your evidence.

A Note from the Author

Contrary to what most trial manuals teach, there is a right way to try cases and maximize effectiveness with juries, and it has virtually nothing to do with enhancing your personal credibility with the jury. Our book holds that at each phase of the trial—opening statements, direct and cross-examinations, closing arguments, and so forth—you should limit your presentation to your best evidence and arguments. This book explains why you can lose your case by failing to do so, and it instructs how you can win your case by exploiting your opponent's failure to follow this rule. We wrote the book because we knew we had developed a new and stunningly effective approach to trying cases. This approach enables trial advocates to routinely start chalking up favorable verdicts in even their most challenging cases.

Reviews

"This is one of the best trial strategy and tactics books written in the last twenty years. The authors have articulated ways of thinking about jury trials that talented and experienced trial lawyers have instinctively followed for years. They explain better than anyone how to think about presenting a case."
—Rick Friedman and Patrick Malone in Rules of the Road

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