News — Trial Lawyer

Trial Lawyers and the Issue of Objections

Trial Lawyers and the Issue of Objections
Law schools teach that you should object to every objectionable question, and raise every issue in litigation. Following your law school education on these issues risks you losing your clients' trial. Instead of following legal dogma, Trial Guides products provide practical advice by leading practicing lawyers on how to best represent your clients.
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Becoming a Trial Lawyer: Forget Playing it Safe

Becoming a Trial Lawyer: Forget Playing it Safe

The way to play it safe in law school was to raise and explain every possible issue. If five arguments supported a particular result, you had better discuss them all. Civil and criminal classes support this type of issue spotting, and some law firms believe this works in litigation. But, this law school training works against you at trial.

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Becoming a Trial Lawyer: Beyond Technique

Becoming a Trial Lawyer: Beyond Technique
Lawyers with nearly flawless technique can lose case after case, while lawyers who appear clumsy and bumbling can win repeatedly. To be a good trial lawyer, be willing and able to give yourself to the jury. Not the self you wish you were or the self you think the jury might wish you were, but your actual self, the part of you that is scared, angry, or tired and the part of you that feels the justness of your case.
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$20 million verdict obtained using Show the Story

$20 million verdict obtained using Show the Story
Trial Verdict Success: I am an attorney in Texas and I cannot speak highly enough of your recent publication Show the Story by William and Robert Bailey. I just used the visual strategies outlined in this book to win a unanimous jury verdict of $20 million in Houston, Texas. This verdict was twice what we asked for throughout voir dire and all the way through closing arguments.
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"Trial In Action" reviewed in The Colorado Lawyer

"Trial In Action" reviewed in The Colorado Lawyer
Book Review: Trial in Action presents a unique twist on the trial lawyer’s art. The authors strongly believe that, as a trial lawyer, "your goal is to help your juries hear, see, and feel your client’s stories." As a means to this end, they present the technique of legal "psychodrama," in which the lawyer prepares for trial through dramatic role playing.
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