News

$40 Million Verdict for Nick Rowley and Team

$40 Million Verdict for Nick Rowley and Team

Trial Guides author Nick Rowley, along with lawyers Keith Bruno, Angela Bruno, Steve King, and Trial Guides coauthor Steve Halteman (trial consultant) obtained a record $40 million verdict. The $40 million verdict was in noneconomic damages for the death of thirty-three-year old Orlando Jordan. His parents were the plaintiffs. The case involved the stabbing and killing of Mr. Jordan by an underage drinker. Rey and Carmen Jordan sued TGI Fridays and the Riverside restaurant’s operator, New Jersey-based Briad Group, arguing that the employees there knowingly served alcohol to intoxicated minors, including one of their son’s attackers. Rowley represented the decedent’s mother, with Keith...

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Ken Levinson Reviews: On Becoming a Trial Lawyer by Rick Friedman

Ken Levinson Reviews: On Becoming a Trial Lawyer by Rick Friedman

“There are a plethora of books and resources to improve your technical skills. But among the countless tomes and guides on shelves these days, Rick Friedman’s On Becoming a Trial Lawyer provides a decidedly fresh perspective on the mechanics and traits necessary to become an effective trial lawyer. Perhaps the fact that Friedman admits he isn’t a “naturally” gifted trial lawyer helps us to feel this way. It’s this encouraging sense of honesty that gives him credibility; a candid approach for the newly minted — even veteran — attorneys who might feel discouraged by recent shortcomings. His insights are often an invigorating reminder...

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Trial Guides Customer Wins $32.5M Verdict using Rules of the Road

Trial Guides Customer Wins $32.5M Verdict using Rules of the Road

Mr. Friedman, I once wrote you about the successes my brother and I have enjoyed using the information we learned in Rules of the Road and Polarizing the Case. Well, on Wednesday the Rules prevailed again—this time for $32.5 million. To begin with, my co-counsel initially had the case and took it to trial; but it resulted in a mistrial, which the defense had requested. The defendant’s final offer before the mistrial was $100,000. I enjoy pondering about how much the defense regrets the decision to move for a mistrial, because upon having the mistrial granted our soon to be co-counsel drove to...

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Forget About Your Case and Start Telling a Story

Forget About Your Case and Start Telling a Story

The only way to harness the minds and hearts of your jurors is to forget about your case and start telling a story. Threading a storyline into the entire courtroom drama and empowering your jurors to become heroes will awaken each jurors’ desire to be the hero and motivate them to action. Through this change in perspective, you will find yourself becoming the mentor, your client assuming the role of the story’s victim, and your jurors, inspired to action, taking the most powerful role of all. So, what makes a case a story? Stories have a distinctive point of view. You...

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Ten Wrong Reasons for Not Doing Focus Groups

Ten Wrong Reasons for Not Doing Focus Groups

Excerpt From Advanced Depositions Strategy & Practice by Phillip Miller and Paul Scoptur 1. I have all the proof I need.This statement is an example of ego gone wild. As we have said, there is lawyer proof and there is jury proof. The proof that the jury needs to find in your favor is often very different than what we as lawyers think is important. Without knowing the jury proof, you will miss critical evidence and testimony in your case. When there is something the jurors want to know—part of their proof—and it is missing from the evidence, they will make up whatever facts they...

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