News — trial guides

Calling the Defense Expert's Bluff

Calling the Defense Expert's Bluff
In "Polarizing the Case: Exposing & Defeating the Malingering Myth," Friedman provides what he calls "a guidebook for wrapping the malingering defense around the defense lawyer's neck and strangling him with it."
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Settle Your Case with Advance Depositions

Settle Your Case with Advance Depositions

With over 99% of civil legal cases settling before jury verdict, Trial Guides asked some of its authors to comment about how their book can be used not just in trial, but how to settle your case using their methods. An Interview with Paul Scoptur, co-author of Advanced Depositions: Strategy and Practice Obtaining Maximum Settlement Offers After Deposition By taking exceptional depositions, you get excellent settlements. A book on advanced depositions helps you get better settlement value on your case. Whether or not the case goes to trial, you have to do this anyway. You need to neutralize or take...

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$13.3 Million Verdict During COVID-19 Using From Hostage to Hero

Plaintiffs’ attorney Chris Madeksho shared with us strategies from From Hostage to Hero that he used to win the case:

Sari’s book helped me organize my voir dire so that I could examine the panel in an organized way given the time constraints (30 minutes per panel) that parties were given. Further, Sari’s book gave clear advice on how to “make it about the jury” by using their language and their ideas in opening and closing. The jury “got it” because of this advice.

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$10.8 Million Medical Malpractice Verdict during COVID-19

On August 25, 2020, Blair County, PA, attorneys Brendan Lupetin and Greg Unatin received a $10.8 million-dollar verdict for their clients in a medical malpractice case. Plaintiffs’ attorney Brendan Lupetin shared with us strategies from Trial by Human, Voir Dire and Opening Statements, and Nick’s recorded lectures that he used to win the case.
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From Hostage to Hero Book Review

From Hostage to Hero Reviewed by Jason Skuda

“Jurors are, for all intents and purposes, hostages.” This concept begins Sari de la Motte’s advice on approaching jury trials. As hostages, jurors are the trial’s first of two “victims.” They arrive unhappy, discombobulated, and, more often than not, scared. The plaintiff’s lawyer must free the jurors by creating a safe space for jurors to express themselves in voir dire and to act on the plaintiff’s behalf when they deliberate.

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