News — Jury Bias

Ask, Analyze, and Act

Ask, Analyze, and Act

Ashley B. Fournet reviews Winning Case Preparation: Understanding Jury Bias by David R. Bossart, Gregory Cusimano, Edward H. Lazarus & David A. Wenner  Winning Case Preparation: Understanding Jury Bias is a book from which every lawyer can benefit. David Bossart, Gregory Cusimano, Edward Lazarus, and David Wenner use their collective knowledge and experience as trial lawyers and jury bias experts to identify and discuss how to combat anti-plaintiff jury biases. An essential read for trial lawyers, this book provides excellent insights into how to configure your case. Building on their focus group research, the authors describe five common biases jurors may exhibit—suspicion, victimization, personal responsibility,...

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Preparing for the Only Thing that Matters: What the Jury Will Think

Preparing for the Only Thing that Matters: What the Jury Will Think

By Rafael Urquia Originally published in the December 2018 issue of Trial News, the monthly newspaper of the Washington State Association for Justice. Good lawyers with good cases lose trials – all the time. What? Impossible! This defies all common sense and reasoning. I’m a trial lawyer. I know how to present case! Good lawyers with good cases lose jury trials because six to twelve community members decide a case not a lawyer or a judge. So, it does not matter if you are the world’s greatest lawyer or you have the world’s greatest case. If you do not effectively communicate...

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Jury Bias Model™ and Bottom-Up Preparation

Written by Winning Works Bias is an inclination or prejudice in favor of or against something, a person, a group or thought when compared to another. Often, it is considered to be unfair. Bias can work for or against you. Everyone has feelings, beliefs and attitudes that color their perceptions of the world. Identifying how potential jurors make judgments, form opinions and explain behavior is critical to the outcome of your trial. When a potential juror holds a bias that is key to the issues inherent to your case, the potential juror cannot be expected to evaluate the evidence objectively...

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